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Category Archives: Plaid Ambassador

Mod Podge Anniversary Party!

As you know I use Mod Podge and Plaid products in pretty much every aspect of my life except food preparation (and I may get there – it’s non-toxic after all).

And today, May 19th, happens to be National Mod Podge Day in honor of its 50th Anniversary!

And I know you’re asking yourself, “David (not sure why you’re calling yourself David but it’s cool) how can I celebrate this milestone in gluing history!?!?”

Well, David, I’m glad you asked and there are lots of ways!

As you can see above, Plaid is running an all day celebration on their Facebook page with tutorials, contests and giveaways.

And the good folks at Plaid have provided me with a plentiful Mod Podge Gift Basket to provide to one lucky winner.

Here is what you get!

-8 OZ. M/P GLOSS
-8 OZ. M/P Matte
-8 Oz. Dishwasher Safe Gloss
-Mod Podge Photo Transfer Medium 2 Oz. Carded
-Mod Podge Silicone Craft Mat
-Mod Podge 7 Piece Tool Kit
-M/P 4pc Spouncer Set
-M/P 4pc Foam Brush Set

I use and have used all of these products in numerous projects on this blog and I assure you I will use them in numerous projects to come.  Just think how ahead-of-the-curve you’ll be!

To participate in the giveaway just:

Leave a comment telling me how you first heard about Cheltenham Road.

And visit the Rafflecopter site by clicking here and enter your email address (just so I can tell whoever wins that they won – you’re not going to end up on mailing list or anything).

The raffle runs through Monday, the winner will be chosen at random and announced here on the blog.

So Happy Anniversary Mod Podge – in all honesty I’d be pretty lost without you!

Farmhouse Style Shelf Idea

Thanks so much for all the kind words about my new focus (and for not virtually patting me on the head).  I truly appreciated it.

But I want to assure you that the blog isn’t going to turn into a place where all I talk about and make are gifts.  As my wise brother-in-law Rich pointed out gifts come in many forms and one can always gift themselves so we have a lot of room here.  In short, don’t worry.  I won’t be saying “gift” every other sentence.  I promise.

Gift!

(sorry, couldn’t resist)

OK, onward!

When my sisters vistited we browsed a large retail store that sells things that help you stay organized and I saw this clever shelving unit.

 

Cool!  Right?!

Simple, versatile.

But it’s a two foot long, three sided, Medium Density Fiberboard box with holes on the bottom edge.

And it costs $100!!!

So!

………..Welcome to SPITE CRAFTING: SPRING EDITION!……….

(I had no idea this was going to be an ongoing series)

OK I guess $100 isn’t crazy expensive but the idea seemed so do-able-for-less that I had to give it a shot.  So maybe not Spite Crafting so much as Idea Stealing.

Here is what I used for my version

From my scrap pile I pulled some 3/4″ plywood and cut it down to size.

  • The front is 24″ long by 3.75″ high
  • The sides are 3″ long by 3.75″ high
  • And the internal shelf is 22.5″ long by 3″ deep

On the back side I marked  a center line and indicated where I would drill the holes.

Live-and-Learn: in retrospect I realize it would have been easier to mark and drill on the front side of the board….next time! 

And then got to work with my drill press at Forstner bit.

I was drilling from the back and I wanted to minimize any tear out on the front side so I placed a piece of scrap wood under by board and didn’t drill all the way through with the Forstner bit – just enough for the point to poke through the other side.

Once all the initial holes were drilled I flipped it over to complete the drilling  for a nice clean look.

I then assembled the whole thing using wood glue and my nailer

And then it was time to get creative.

The folks at Plaid had provided me with Waverly Chalk Paint and brushes and I thought I’d give them a try.

I used their Ivory color for the base.  The special Waverly Chalk Brush isn’t required but it sure made applying the paint easy as it holds a lot and spreads really smoothly.  I think I’ll be glad I have it especially on larger projects.

I’m a new and enthusiastic convert to the chalk paint thing (I know I’m very behind on this curve).  It’s easy to apply, dries fast and comes in great colors – what’s not to like?

Once the paint dried I moved on to other newish thing  – stencils.

For this project I used the Folk Art Farmers Market Stencil Set and a small Folk Art Stencil Brush

I used a light pencil line to keep everything straight

And then stenciled away using both the Waverly “Crimson” and “Ink” colors

Stenciling is pretty easy once you get the idea of using very little paint on the brush.  But I think my inexperience showed as my only complaint about this set is that it was tricky, even with a small brush not to accidentally catch the edge of the stencil I wasn’t intending to use.  Probably a rookie mistake.  Next time I’ll use some painters tape to tape off the “unwanted” stencils.

Once everything dried I gave the edges a bit of a sanding and then a light rubbing with Waverly Antiquing wax.

I used a couple of d-ring hangers on the back and my shelf was ready for its close-up.

(I’m not crazy about my choice to stencil he “No” on the ednd there.  The stencil is fine but it would have been better if I’d had space for a number as well so, as it is, it just kinda looks….I don’t know…unnecessarily negative?)

The antiquing wax did a nice job of bringing out the texture in the wood and making the whole thing look just a bit more vintage.  It’s hard to see in the pics as I went pretty light on this first-time-out attempt but next time I think I will be a bit more daring as I really like the extra texture.

I had envisioned this as a kitchen thing but it occurred to me it could work in any room – like perhaps for crafts?Tons of possibilities!

Further Thoughts:

  • *I always hesitate to use my “I invested in some serious tools” tools on these projects for fear of turning people off.  But all of these things can be accomplished using more standard methods (a regular drill with a forstner bit, nails or screws rather than a pnumatic nailer) it just takes a bit longer.
  • I made my shelf out of scraps of plywood but the original is MDF.  MDF is a great choice for easy to work with, smooth surface finishes and I think, if I make more of these I’ll switch over to it.

Disclaimer:  The good folks at Plaid provided me with the materials for this project.  All opinions are strictly my own and I received no other financial compensation for this post.  Links provided are not affiliate links – just trying to be helpful.

DIY Wedding Reception Table Numbers Tutorial

Sometimes I just….get an idea.

I’m not getting married.  No one I know is getting married and yet….here we are.

Welcome to Cheltenham Road: Bridal Edition

I seriously don’t know where this came from but it popped into my head but it just seemed so fun and easy I kinda had to do it.  Since weddings are all about family (the ones attending and the new one being created) I thought it would be cool to have the table numbers reflect and pay tribute to the family.

I used:

  • Chalkboard Easels from Michaels
  • Mod Podge Matte formula
  • Folk Art Milk Paint: Churned Butter
  • Copies of family photos
  • Scrapbook paper
  • A sharp craft knife
  • (ignore the two stick on letters – I changed my mind)
  • Folk Art Stencils (not pictured)
  • Folk Art Chalk PaintP Rich Black(not pictured)
  • Black Sharpie

The easels are in the craft-wood aisle at Michaels and they come in a couple of different sizes and are pretty affordable at $4.00 each.

After painting the easels with the Milk Paint and setting them aside to dry I resized and printed out some family photos (that’s my mom and dad and my lovely sister Phebe).

Using the Mod Podge I adhered the pics to the font of the easels and then flipped them over and did the same with the scrapbook paper on the other side.

After a little drying time I used my craft knife to trim away any extra paper and then used a black sharpie just to highlight the edge of the easel.Next I sealed the photographs with some more Mod Podge.

And then I…..changed my mind.

I was going to use the stick on letters shown above pic (simply because I had them on hand) but realized that a stencil would be great.

So, I raced to my vast supply of  Folk Art stencils and chalk paint and made quick work of it

And Boom!

Table numbers!

I think they’d be a fun way to get conversations going at a reception.  And I nice way to include the family history in an event that’s all about family.

Now I realize (from watching reality TV) that some brides might not be into having other brides pictures at their weddings.  But you could use any photo. 

My nephew recently got married and they took a whole series of really fun engagement photos which would be great for this.  Or you could just do family photos, mom, dad, grandparents etc.  Maybe even embarrassing photos of bad hair styles of days past – you know, something for folks to talk about while waiting for the chicken dish to be served.

Now, if one of you all could get married I could justify this whole, random post!

Disclaimer: The good folks at Plaid provided me with all the materials (except the easels) for this project as part of their Plaid Ambassador Program.  All ideas and opinions are my own.

 

beach frame

beach frame

make-it-for-less-beach-style-vintage-photo-holder-tutorial-by-cheltenham-roadI’m a silly person (it’s possible this has dawned on you previously)

And I have a question.

Is it wrong to do projects just out of spite?

Because I think I just did.

Welcome to Spite Crafting with Cheltenham Road

Backstory:  I can be a bit over-thrifty.  I don’t like to spend money.

Total Truth: I started Cheltenham Road partly because I was tired of the sticker shock I got every time I visited PB or Restoration Hardware.  My vow was that I wanted people to be pleasantly surprised when they flipped a CR price tag over and I try very hard to hold to that goal.

But I’m still subject to sticker shock.

The other day I was wandering a big box store and came across this:big-store-photo-holder

Cool.  Kinda fun.  Not something I need or want but I liked it.

And then I checked the pricebeach-photo-frame

$50?!!!

And that….kinda made me mad?  I don’t know…I just suddenly had to make one.  Just to prove that it didn’t need to cost that much.

Spite crafting.

So I went home, pulled supplies and did my own.

Here’s what I used.

simple-rustic-photo-display-tutorial-by-cheltenham-road

  • 16×16  frame*
  • Folk Art Milk Paint (Petticoat and Veranda Blue)**
  • 6 pieces of thin Luan scrap wood cut to 2 inches high by 16″ long
  • Sandpaper
  • Glue
  • String
  • Screws
  • Clothespins

* I want to be honest here.  I had intended to use a thrift store frame for this project.  But my local thrift store is “closed for remodeling.”  (Who remodels a thrift store?  It’s a big room with stuff piled in it – it’s not like anyone is hoping for better lighting or a juice bar…..well,…actually I do live in Southern California so actually someone might be hoping for a juice bar…OK I take it back.  I look forward to my next combo thrift shopping/cleanse experience).  So I made this very basic frame from scrap wood.  

I cut the scrap wood backer to size and painted the frame, 3 backing strips and 3 clothespins with the Petticoat White Milk Paint.  I painted two strips and three clothespins with the Veranda Blue Milk Paint and left three of the backing strips unpainted. Once everything had dried I did a light sanding for a distressed look.

The Folk Art Milk Paint worked beautifully for this project.  It’s easy to work with, has great coverage (one coat this time) and dries very quickly.   I’m enjoying working with it.

photo-display-idea

After gluing the slats in place

rustic-beachy-photo-display-tutorial-by-cheltenham-road

It was time to attach the string.

I drilled holes through the frame at 4 inches from the top and bottom on both sidesphoto-frame-tutorial-drill

and ran the string through the holes.

To keep the string in place I wrapped the ends around screws and drilled them into the holes.diy-cottage-style-photo-display-frame-tutorial

And that’s it!simple-beachy-photo-display-holder-by-cheltenham-roadDone!  It took, at most, a couple of hours not counting paint/glue drying time.rustic-photo-display-tutorial-by-cheltenham-road

And not too different from the originalstore-bought-vs-diy-photo-display-tutorial

A beachy,  vintagy,  sorta spitefully motivated photo display!!!!

In Fairness: I do recognize that stores have lots of expenses, employees, overhead, insurance  and $50 isn’t that exorbitant.  I just….had a moment….

I also recognize that not everyone has easy access to the tools and supplies I had on hand to make this project.  But I do believe anyone could make something similar for very little money using a thrift store frame ($5-$10) and any leftover paint.  The backer strips aren’t structural and could be made out of anything – scrapbook paper, cardboard, matte board, heck, even fabric.  If you didn’t have access to a drill the string could be, as it is in the store-version, just tacked on the front of the frame.

**Disclaimer:  The good folks at Plaid provided me with the milk paint for this project as part of their Plaid Ambassador program.  I received no other compensation and all the opinions and experiences are my own.  Any links provided are simply for informational purposes – I receive no remuneration if you click on them.

Sally’s Visit and Paper Jewelry

My sister Sally is visiting me this week.

My oldest sister and I have a lot in common and once she stopped using the phrase “unnecessary addition” and “ruined everything” to describe my birth we’ve gotten along great!*

(*I’m joking of course, everyone always has been and always will be overjoyed to have me around.  Please remember that if we ever meet.  If you can’t quite put your finger on the emotion you’re experiencing it is overjoyedness.  Trust me.)

Sally dabbled in acting too and has always been an artist working in all sorts of media.  She has, for a long time, had a great passion for paper.  She makes her own paper, does paper sculptures, books etc – it’s all quite beautiful.

After she arrived for her visit and we had chatted a bit she brought out this small bagpaulas-bag

(which, keeping it in the family, was made for her by our sister Paula)

and out of it pulled these suppliessally-kit

Intrigued (and a bit concerned that I wasn’t keeping her sufficiently entertained) I asked her what it was for and she told me about her current passion for making paper jewelry and that this is her travelling workshop.

I’d never heard of paper jewelry and I was fascinated to watch her work.

After cutting out some simple ovals of various sizespieces-parts

she carefully wrapped/molded them into her desired shape and glued them together producing these super cool earrings.ear-rings

Then, she shared a picture of some of her other, finished work:paper-ear-rings-by-sarah-alger

Aren’t they beautiful?!  All made of paper.

And then Sally then revealed her true purpose.

In the paper jewelry game durability is kinda key.

She’d been using a fairly expensive product to coat her work but wanted to experiment with Mod Podge Stiffy to see if it would provide the same results.   And since she knew I was the Mod Podge Ambassador in the family she thought I might have a stash.mod-podge-stiffy

As luck would have it, the good folks at Plaid had sent me a bottle of Stiffy.   I haven’t experimented with it since, A) I don’t really do much with fabric and, B) I’m waaaaay too juvenile to use it or reference it without bursting into extremely immature giggles and/or feel like I’m writing 50 Shades of Grey – Craft Edition.

Anyway, Sally wanted to try it out which was perfect!

She grabbed the Stiffy…

….nope!…

OK.  Let’s try that again.

She dabbed the Stiffy….

….ugh…..

She found the Stiffy….

….I can’t do this…..

OK, sorry, I need to grow up.  But that’s clearly not going to happen anytime soon so………….I’m just going to call it Voldemort.

Take two!

Sally brushed the Voldemort on and between the layers of paper and let them dry. stiffy I was impressed and so was she! It worked beautifully.  Mod Podge Voldemort both provided adhesion between the layers but also gave the earrings just the right amount of sturdiness so that they will hold up to wear and tear.  These just need a final sealing coat on the back and the addition of the findings and she’s good to go.

She has a bunch of other stuff with her so I’m hoping she shows me more of what she’s working on during the visit.

But I’m not going to make her work on her earrings the whole time she’s here.  No, the garage needs cleaning and I need some coaster backs cut too! (she’s overjoyed.  See?!)

Perfect.

Disclaimer: The good folks at Plaid have provided me (though they probably regret it at this point) with Mod Podge Voldemort as part of my Plaid Ambassador position.  All opinions and juvenile asides are totally on me and I have not received any other compensation for this post.  Links are provided just for reference and convenience.

Folk Art Painted Finishes and Mossy Skulls

Disclaimer: The products used in this post were provided to me free of charge by Plaid Enterprises.  I have not been compensated in any other way and all opinions are my own.

As I’ve whined about noted previously, the challenge for me of late is to find time to step away from being a little factory, to get to just play and make things that aren’t “potential products.”

One of the great things about being a Plaid Ambassador is that, when I find that time, I am surrounded by potential projects that they have generously provided.

They have given me a great selection of their Folk Art Painted Finishes line of paints including:   Barnwood (my previous project), concrete and….moss.folk-art-painted-finishes

Now, I must admit that when I opened the box  and saw “moss” my first thought was “and why would I want to do that?”  I have enough trouble with actual moss cropping up – fake moss seemed like an unnecessary addition.

But then Halloween season happened and I discovered that I was brimming with sort of odd, creepy Halloween ideas and that one of those ideas required fake moss!!! Huzzah!

So, you may recall my ugly, 1970s porch light had conked out recentlyporch-light

and rather than throw it away I thought I might be able to do something with it.  Blog-reader (and genuinely very cool lady) Denise came up with a fun suggestion that sparked an idea.  I didn’t use the broccoli but I did keep it green!

The Painted Finishes come in two colors:  Light Moss and Dark Moss and applying them is quick and very, very easy (I say this as a person who is deeply unskilled at faux painting techniques)folk-art-painted-finishes-technique-moss

After removing the glass and cleaning the porch light I went over it, as directed, with, well…. lets just call them splotches…..of the Dark Green Finish using the Painted Finishes Shortie Brushes.8b62e23f0ba81b7b9dfc8274c86f5e02

folk-art-painted-finishes-halloween-decoration-projectThen, while the paint was still wet I went back in with the light green color.folk-art-painted-finish-moss-halloween-decor-idea

The paint has some texture to it and when you combine them it really does have depth and realistic, mossy, look.

I did the same technique on the decorative crown and on a little round – I-don’t-know-what-it-is-nor-why-I-have-it decorative piece of metal that I wanted to use for the base and as a holder for a tealight.create-faux-moss-look-with-folk-art-painted-finishes

With the addition of a small, plastic skull from the .99 Store I had a suitably unnerving centerpiece/diorama

The moss technique looks good in broad daylight (I think I did a better job on the sides than I did on the crown thingy but i can always go back in and touch up)faux-moss-technique-with-folk-art-painted-finishes-tutorial

But when darkness comes and the candles get lit ……halloween-decoration-easy-skull-centerpiece

(although I may have freaked out my neighbors since I photographed this on the driveway and it looked  like I had invested in some random, disturbing shrine.)

I don’t think the plastic skull was actually made to be a illuminated  and doing so revealed a very odd/bad/splotchy paint job that really like!

halloween-skull-project-by-cheltenham-road

But, in conclusion, I have to say I’m a fan of the faux moss! halloween-decor-by-cheltenham-road It took, literally, 5 minutes to apply, dried quickly and looked great. It would be easy to apply to a terra cotta pot that you wanted to give a bit of age to.  Or maybe a faux brick wall.  I’m now kind of flooded with ideas for things that NEED to be mossy.

Happy Halloween Season everyone!

 

 

Folk Art Barnwood Painted Finish Technique, Stenciling and Mean Elementary School Teachers

easy-two-step-technique-to-create-an-aged-barnwood-effectDisclaimer: Plaid has provided me with the tools and materials for this project.  All opinions, however, are my own.

The folks at Folk Art have made a line of water based finishes that mimic the look of Concrete, Moss, Rust and Barnwood.

I’ve been itching to try out the Barnwood look.   I just wasn’t sure what I wanted to try it out on.

As usual I dithered a while and finally decided to use it on a simple crate.

But, as my plan evolved I realized I needed to face and overcome a longstanding fear:reasonable-vs-unreasonable-fears-list

I’m not quite sure why I find the idea of stenciling intimidating but I’ve kind of avoided using stencils all this time.

However, Plaid has sent me hundreds of stencils.  It appears that they too think I should get over myself.

To create the crate I used:diy-antique-crate-supplies

  • (2) 3.5x 1/2 craft wood strips cut to 11.5″ long
  • (2) 3.5×1/2″ craft wood strips cut to 7″ long
  • (1) piece of fiberboard for the bottom cut to 6 3/4″ x 12 1/4″
  • screws
  • brad nails (not pictured)
  • Hammer

To create the Barnwood  Paint Effect and Stencil I used

barnwood-stencil-supplies

  • Folk Art Barnwood Tint
  • Folk Art Barnwood Wax
  • Folk Art Milk Paint Brush (Folk Art Shortie Brushes are recommended for this technique but I didn’t have one on hand)
  • Craft Stick
  • Soft cloth
  • Folk Art Acrylic Craft Paint (Imperial Red)
  • Folk Art “Farmers Market” stencil
  • Plaid Stencil Brush

I will confess I was surprised to find out that “Barnwood” did not mean it was red.  But despite that initial hiccup I discovered that using the finish to creating the Barnwood look was a very easy two step process.

  • I sanded the unfinished wood and applied a coat of the Barnwood Tint
  • Once that had dried (four hours) I went over the surface with a coat of Barnwood Wax.
  • I wiped away any extra wax  and then went back in with a craft stick and scrapped away any excess wax allowing what remained to settle into the grooves of the wood (Note: one of my boards turned out to be a little warped so rather than the stiff craft stick I used a small piece of cardstock that had a bit more flexibility and that worked great).
  • Once I was satisfied with the look I set it aside to dry for 24 hours.faux-barnwood-painting-technique

I was impressed with the result.  There are lots of colors and variations and each of my four pieces ended up looking a bit different which really adds to the look of it.

two-step-barnwood-paint-effect

Then came the stencil!

My practice runs did’t bode well.  There were lots of leaks and blobs and fuzzy, unsatisfactory results.

However,  once I began actually following the instructions (which is a totally cool thing to do – you should try it!) and realized that when they say “you want your brush almost dry” they REALLY mean it I achieved, instantaneous Rock Star stencils.

I was killin’ it!!!! stencil-project

(I was not “killin’ it” however when I failed to center the the words on the wood.  Lets just chalk that up to over-excitement shall we and move on?).

As a matter of fact I was so pleased with how easy it was I stenciled all the other sides as well which wasn’t part of my initial plan.

Assembling the box was just a matter of screwing the sides together and using a few brad nails to attache the bottom.farmers-market-stencil-project

I actually took these final pictures in front of my rather aged backyard fence which I think looks pretty much exactly the same as the “Barnwood” paint!aged-barnwood-technique-tutorial

As an added bonus I had to buy all these vegetables for this picture.  So I will be eating vegetables!

(also, ice cream was on sale so I will be eating ice cream!)

All in all I’m pretty pleased with the Painted Finishes technique and I’m looking forward to trying out (and reporting back) on the other finishes.

And I am now all about stenciling!

The entire line of Folk Art Painted finishes are available and Michaels and JoAnn’s as well as via the Plaid web site (I do not receive any remuneration if you click that link)

*Mrs Gombert:

Tall.  Red, beehive hairdo.  Stern expression.  Limited sense of humor.  Name that sounds like a Middle Earth creature who, at first seems nice but soon reveals an evil plan: The Gombert.

I think she scared everyone but I earned a special place in her dark heart when, one day, after being given what I thought was an unreasonable amount of homework I quite innocently asked why “she got paid if we did all the work?”

OK, as an adult I recognize the flaw in my thinking (teachers please don’t email me) but, as a kid, it made sense to me.  However, this statement caused Mrs Gombert to become somewhat unhinged when it came to me (I once got detention for looking out the window!) and I lived in fear of her for the rest of the year.

She’d be on your list too.  Maybe even above spiders.

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