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Category Archives: DIY Furniture Projects

How To Repair Damaged Furniture

Fix Damaged Furniture with BondoThis is the promised follow-up post about poor, patient Geralyn’s little sewing cabinet thingy.

As you may recall – it was in pretty bad shapeSewing Cabinet Makeover Tutorial

Iffy finish and a big chunk taken out of the wood on one corner.
Damaged furniture fix-up tutorial

As you also may recall, several years ago I did a post about repairing damaged furniture with Bondo.Fix damaged furniture with Bondo

It is actually my most popular post!  Which is awesome because nothing says “I’m totally killing it with this blogging thing” like having your most popular post be five years old.

Anyway, I knew I would use Bondo again but I doubted Bondo alone would be a sturdy enough repair to allow the little door to hinge open as it was supposed to do.Bondo Can

So, using an old furniture-fixer trick, I just glued a tooth-pick in the the hollow cavity where the old screw went.Fixing damaged corners on furniture

The toothpick will fill the void and give the new screw something to dig into.  And the wood glue provides a bond that is actually stronger than the the real wood.

After the glue had dried thoroughly, I mixed up the Bondo and applied a pretty generous amount to the damaged corner.  Bondo for fixing furniture

The great thing about Bondo is that, once it dries you can sand and shape it to match pretty much any contour (which I did but nelected to photograph) and then paint over it for a pretty seamless fix.Furniture Fix up with Bondo

After that it was just a matter of drilling a pilot hole for the screw and I was done!fixing up damaged furniture

Folk Art Milk Paint Furniture Makeover by Cheltenham RoadAnd then I got busy (on the other side) with the image transfer and the edge sanding (you can see the details of that effort HERE)Image transfer for vintage sewing cabinet by cheltenham road

OK, to be honest, while I’m satisfied with how the repair looks and functions (and I think Geralyn will be too), I’m still a little anxious about the long-term durability of this fix.

The Bondo trick works great on corners or damaged legs but the fact that this little piece has to “hinge” open is a different kettle of fish.

So I’m going to urge Geralyn to make the part with the new graphic on it her main point of access – just to be on the safe side.

Up next time.  Some new Halloween projects!

Sewing Cabinet Makeover with Milk Paint and Mod Podge Transfer

My name is David and I am your Plaid Craft Ambassador.

I promise to keep things civil, try to hear all sides of the argument and I hope we can come to some consensus on the issue to prevent an outright craft war.

OK, actually, I want to reiterate that Plaid provided me with craft supplies for this project but all the opinions and experiences are my own.  Other than receiving the craft materials I was not compensated for this project and any  links I provide are purely to be helpful – I don’t receive an affiliate kick-back or anything.

All the products I used are new(ish) and are now available in most craft stores or via the Plaid Enterprises site.

With that out of the way lets get on to the project.

Geralyn asked me if I could fix up this woebegone little sewing cabinet thingy. Sewing Cabinet Makeover Tutorial

I happily said yes, put it in the garage and then pretended not to see it for….. several years.

As you can see it was damaged on that front corner and I couldn’t figure out how to fix it.

So I kept hoping inspiration would strike (or that Geralyn would forget about it).

Happily it struck!  (and I don’t know if Geralyn forgot although if she didn’t she did display great patience)

But that repair is the subject of different post.

So, just bear with me as I fast-forward.  I fixed the problem and now it’s time to spruce the little guy up a bit.

I used the following productsSewing Box Makeover Tutorial by Cheltenham Road

  • Folk Art Milk Paint – Petticoat
  • Folk Art Milk Paint Bonding Primer and Sealer
  • Mod Podge Transfer Medium
  • Folk Art Milk Paint brushes
  • A reverse printed image from the Graphics Fairy
  • Glass cleaner
  • 120 grit sandpaper
  • damp towel (for the image transfer part)

After cleaning the whole piece with glass cleaner (new idea for me but recommended by the Folk Art directions and it worked quite nicely) I primed it with the Folk Art Bonding Primer and Sealer.

The Primer goes on with and looks slightly milky but dries clear.  Actually, it almost made me not want to paint the thing because it made the finish look much better….but where’s the fun in that?

Up next, my first experience with milk paint.

Like all of you I’d heard about it for a long time but hadn’t tried it.  Plaid has come up with a version that comes pre-mixed and ready to go.

I brushed on an initial coat using the designed for the purpose.

A minimum of two coats is required for this paint and, as you can see, the first coast went on a bit streaky.
1st coat

But, it’s ready for it’s re-coat in 30 minutes  and the second coat gave a beautiful finish.Folk Art Milk Paint Furniture Makeover by Cheltenham Road

Up next was the image transfer.

As you know I’ve experimented with a lot of different image transfer techniques.  What I’m discovering is that each one has it’s advantages and disadvantages and I like having kind of an arsenal of options at my disposal.  I’ve had very satisfactory results with Mod Podge Image Transfer in the past – it’s easy to work with and produces the perfect, slightly distressed, vintage look I wanted.

I printed my image in reverse on my laser printer.

To do the transfer I lay a good thick coat of the transfer medium over the printed side of the paper*sewing case makeover with Mod Podge Transfer by Cheltenham Roadand then place it, Mod Podge Side, down on the surface of the furniture and smooth out any wrinkles or air bubbles.

You also want to have a damp towel on hand to clean up any excess MP Transfer that squeezes out because it’s much harder to clean it up when it dries.

I applied it to the cabinet and let it dry overnight (the long drying time is the only disadvantage of this technique – I’m just seldom that patient).

(*spreading the transfer goo on the paper can be a bit messy.  Mod Podge makes a really great silicone mat that you can buy – you can kinda see it in my picture- that works great and is easy to clean up.  If you don’t have that (I bought mine a few years ago) though, lay down a piece of plastic wrap or something to protect whatever surface you’re working on)

The next day I dampened the image with a cloth and then, using the same damp cloth gently rubbed away the paper to reveal the image underneath.Image Transfer with Mod Podge Transfer Medium by Cheltenham Road

With all of these transfer techniques keep in mind that you’re not transferring just the image but also a super thin, pretty-much transparent layer of the paper that the image is attached too as well.  If you rub too hard you’ll just rub off that thin layer of paper along with your image (I did that in one spot you’ll see in a sec) so “gently” is the key word here.

Once I was satisfied with the look of the transfer I sanded the edges of the whole piece using 120 grit sandpaper and then gave the whole thing a protective sealing coat of the Folk Art Bonding Primer and Sealer.

Image transfer for vintage sewing cabinet by cheltenham road

You can see, in this pic, where I got a bit to agressive with the rubbing right there in that black circle at the end of the word “Barbour.”  I think it just adds to the distressed, vintagy look but it is a goof.
vintage sewing case makeover by cheltenham road

I think Geralyn will be pleased with the look.

So, I’m happy to report that my first experience with Milk Paint was pretty great.  It went on smoothly, clean up was easy and I really like the look.  This is particularly good because, as you know, I have A LOT of it!Folk Art Milk PaintSo I’m looking forward to more projects (and to mixing my own colors which is, apparently, an option).

I will share a post about how I fixed that banged up corner soon.

David

 

 

Children’s Chair Makeover Tutorial and a huge THANK YOU!

First of all a HUGE THANK YOU to all of you who went out and pinned (and favorited which was very kind as well) stuff from Etsy.

Etsy is going through a bunch of behind-the-scenes changes and it’s sort of messing with my views on there but I just have to show you something.

These were my stats for Saturday – which were crazy low:CR Stats March 19

And these were my shop stats after you all got to work!CR Stats March 20And the ripple has continued so, truly, THANK YOU!

In other news.

My hinted at furniture project for Mod Podge Rocks is up and ready for review.Ikea chair makeover by Cheltenham Road

So, some background.

I come from a family of readers.

My grandfather had a full-fledged library in his basement complete with a card catalogue.

As a kid our pre-dinner ritual was to gather around the table and read a book aloud (this devolved eventually into just snacking and drinking martinis* which is an equally valuable use of time).

Some of my fondest memories are of my dad reading to me at bedtime and I still have the abridged Classic Tales books he used. (Of course, being a petulant and not particularly bright child, when I was mad at him I would REFUSE TO ALLOW HIM TO READ TO ME! and I’m sure he was like, “son, you’re an idiot. Go to bed”)

I was also one of those children whose mom had to say “I’m taking your book away and you are going outdoors!” on a semi-regular basis.

Anyway.  Books.  Good!

So, when I saw this little chair at the thrift store I had one of those moments when you know EXACTLY what you’re going to do and you take it home and do EXACTLY what you had in mind.Child Chair Makeover with Mod Podge Ikea Hack Tutorial

I love those moments.

Rare as they are……

As a bonus it was crazy easychair makeover tutorial by Cheltenham Road

and didn’t take very long – most of the time was spent waiting for things to dry.Easy chair makeover idea by Cheltenham Road

I hope you enjoy the full tutorial and thanks so much again for all the support!

*just to be clear I was not allowed to drink martinis as a child.  HOWEVER, as a child I thought I loved olives.  But once, when offered one outside my loving home, I didn’t like it.  So, in actuality, I didn’t love olives….I loved gin – namely the gin-soaked olives I would beg from my parents.  This realization has helped explain a lot.

Mini Dresser Vintage Camera Project

Vintage Camera Bureau by Cheltenham RoadRecently a blogger, describing a project that was giving her some difficulty, used the phrase “I enjoy a good challenge.”

That sounded good – character building even – encountering problems and through patience and skill rising above them.

And I suddenly realized something.

I do not, in fact, “enjoy a good challenge.”

No, I prefer to get an idea, know exactly how to do it, execute it quickly and then sit back, eat ice cream and bask in my own cleverness.

(The fact that this never happens is completely beside the point.  It also does not stop me from eating ice cream.)

So, a while ago my sister sent me a picture of a dresser made up to look like an old camera and I was intrigued.

I know what you’re thinking, “old cameras?! David! We never saw this coming! Who knew you liked old cameras?! You have so many layers! You’re just an endlessly mysterious onion of a person”

Any you are correct but you really might have had a just few hints…Vintage Camera CollectionRecycle Pallet Wood Display Shelf Cheltenham Road TutorialVintage Camera Coaster Setvintage camera print gallery wal Cheltenham Roadl

Anyway, the creator of the awesome bureau is very talented (you really should check out her blog) and quite an artist.  She hand-painted the camera graphic which is super cool.

But sounds kinda challenging.

So I had to figure out the easy, cheaty way to make my own version.

I wasn’t totally sure my plan would work so I was pretty happy when I found that Michaels sells little, tiny “starter bureaus.”  Perfect!

I grabbed a vintage camera and got to work.Vintage Camera Dresser Project Cheltenham RoadI snapped a high resolution picture of my camera, resized it to the dimensions of the bureau and printed it out.

I then I cut the little knobs off the bureau.

(I also then lost the little knobs and later had to dig through the trash to find them.  Challenging!)

The only problem was that the drawers had spacers between them and if i just painted them black it would break up the camera graphic too much. So I tried it this way:

I removed the drawers, ran a bead of Mod Podge around all the edges and adhered the photo in place.Michaels mini-burea made into a vintage cameraOnce it had really dried I carefully ran my knife around all the openings so that I had sections that were the size of the drawers. DIY Make a Jewelry Box look like a vintage cameraThen I mod podged those sections into place on the drawer fronts and trimmed away any excess.

Once it was dry I sealed it with more Mod Podge.

After recovering the wayward knobs (and feeling my character build in the process) I “painted” them with a sharpie and stuck them on with some E-6000 glue.

I also painted the sides and back of the bureau black and gave it a light sanding for a slightly distressed look.Little vintage dresser camera projectAnd there you have it.  Not too challenging.  My character remains relatively shallow and I feel that ice-cream is within my grasp!

Bonus:  I have a tiny, little dresser that looks like a camera!Michaels Store Craft - Mini Dresser Vintage Camera Project by Cheltenham Road

So, since that worked now the quest is on for a real-sized piece of furniture to work on.  I don’t know that I want an entire dresser (I also don’t need a new dresser) but perhaps I could replace my sofa end tables?  That would look kinda cool I think.

UPDATE:  I’ve been asked if I could include my picture of the Brownie so that others can make this project.  If you right click on the link below it should give you a high resolution PDF of the front of the camera.  Brownie Camera Graphic

 

Make a Rustic Wood Sign that Doubles as a Coat Rack. UWUG Project #6

DIY Coat Rack Tutorial Cheltenham RoadI know that none of you will believe me if I say that old dresser is still yielding scrap wood for projects….BUT IT IS! So welcome to Use What Ya Got Project #6.

I’d became fixated on the idea of making a vintage looking sign that would say “Cabins for Rent.” Do you ever do that? Just get an idea in your mind and you must make it? I have no real use for a coat rack but, nevertheless – I have one now and it says “Cabin’s for Rent” so…..check that off my bucket list.

This project proved to be fun not just from a graphic design standpoint but as another step on the “David tries to make his own knobs” journey.

I started out with the side of the dresser which had that great green color along with a lot of chippiness. Trash To Treasure Dresser Project Cheltenham RoadI sanded it as smooth as possible and came up with a graphic in Photoshop.DIY Sign Tutorial Cheltenham RoadI printed it out (backwards) and grabbed the Lenk tool (you can see more detailed Lenk tutorials here). I’m getting better with the Lenk – it’s fussy but it can do a lot.

I’ve taken to peeling away the paper just a bit at a time to make sure enough color transferred but even doing that, as you can see in the pics below, some paper just stays resolutely stuck in place. But a damp cloth and some gentle rubbing and it cleans away quite nicely.Rustic Sign Tutorial Cheltenham Road

On rough wood like this the transfer is going to be equally rough which, in this case is just what I wanted.  It’s super-chippy and the heat of the Lenk actually melted through in spots to an older color which was OK with me.

So, with my image chippily transferred I turned my attention to the knobs. I wanted them large enough that you could hang something off them and I also wanted them to stick out far enough that they were useful so regular cabinet knobs wouldn’t do.

Looking around the shop I found two dowels that I had bought for……..well, really who knows – but there they were!

I sliced off a 1/2 thick piece of the larger dowel with my chop saw and a 3″ long piece of the smaller dowel. I wanted a really solid connection between the two pieces so I used my drill with a Forstner bit to drill 3/4 of the way through the disc and then glued them together. DIY Knobs by Cheltenham RoadI’d made appropriately sized images for the knobs (the pic shows an earlier version – I had to go back in and make them a bit more distressed) so now I just painted the wood black and Mod Podged the design into place.Custom Knobs Tutorial by Cheltenham RoadI wanted a shiny, finished look to the knobs so I sealed the end with a coat of Envirotex Lite.  It really only takes a few drops.  You could also use Hard Coat Mod Podge or Dimensional Magic (also by Plaid)

When it came time to assemble I used the same Forstner bit to drill almost all the way through the sign and then glued the knob into the hole. Make a rustic sign that doubles as a coat hanger.  Cheltenham RoadI’d previously sealed the sign with a polycrylic spray so now it was just a matter of hanging it up.

(OK, I’ll admit it’s actually hanging on my back yard fence which is not remotely where one needs a towel/coat rack.  But the fence has excellent light and an appropriately rustic look!….unlike most of the rooms in my house.)Tutorial for making a vintage sign.  Cheltenham RoadI may have gone a bit overboard with the distress on the knobsMake custom wood knobs.  Cheltenham Roadand for some reason, in the pics they look like they are a very different color than the “Cabin” text but it’s closer in real life.DIY Rustic Wood Sign Coat Rack by Cheltenham RoadNow I just need a place to hang it, you know……. inside the house.YTTSMain5hostsKnick of Time Inspiration Party

Build a Cocktail Table

With Father’s Day approaching I thought I’d revisit a project I did originally for Mod Podge Rocks.   I came up with this idea for a little side table that, though this one is baseball themed, would work for any room or style. Build a Cocktail Table Cheltenham Road

I used to get frustrated with those people who were always doing projects made with “this old piece of wallpaper/wood/farbric/etc I had lying around.”

I never had an old piece of anything lying around but now I have become one of those people – Some would call it a late developing Hording Syndrome I prefer to think of it as being committed recycler.

Anyway, I had this idea making a little side table that would be affordable and adaptable so I thought I’d share.

It’s made from bits I had sort of lurking in the corners of my garage (with the spiders – seriously, it’s like a science fiction movie in there) but I assure you can do it with some very affordable parts from any big box hardware store.

You will need:DIY Cocktail Table Tutorial Supplies

 

  •  One table leg – mine was from the Habitat for Humanity ReSale Store (a great resource) but they come in all shapes and sizes at big box retailers.
  • Four (4) 7 inch wooden shelf brackets
  •  A shallow shadow box picture frame – you could also use a wooden tray or anything else that appealed
  • Five feet of shoe molding
  • 1 piece of ¼ inch wood cut square and just a little smaller than your picture frame
  • 1 piece of ½ or ¾ inch wood cut square and 2-3 inches smaller than your picture frame
  • Glue (I used Gorilla Glue)
  • Brad Nails (optional)
  • wood screws
  • Sand paper
  • Spray paint
  •  Mod Podge (I know! Suprising!)
  • Envirotex Lite (available at Michaels)

Tools:

Drill, saw (hand saw, miter saw, whatever you’ve got), hammer, foam brush

First off I cut the Table Leg to the height I needed.  They will do this for you at the hardware store if you ask nicely.

Next I cut the shoe molding into eight (8) seven-inch long strips and took the flimsy back out of the picture frame.

Now I was ready to attach the shoe molding to the Table Leg.

DIY Cocktail Table Leg Assembly Cheltenham RoadI centered a Shelf Bracket on base of the Table Leg and drew a line on either side.

Then I attached shoe molding on either side of the line creating a groove. I repeated that on all four sides.

I nailed the shoe molding in place after gluing but if you just wanted to glue them simply wrap rubber bands around the top and bottom to hold them in place while they dry.

Next I just glued the shelf brackets into the slots I’d created and wiped away any glue that squeezed out and set the whole thing aside to dry.

After it dried I painted everything (leg, the edge and one side of both pieces of wood and the picture frame) with a quick coat of spray primer followed by a top coat of black.

Now it was time for Mod Podging.

I placed the frame on the ¼ inch board and traced the inside edge so I’d know how much of the board to cover with my images and got busy.

Man Cave Table Tutorial Cheltenham Road

 

Baseball Theme Table Tutorial Cheltenham RoadThe graphics I used can be found via the Library of Congress’ online catalog (which is a tremendous resource for any project)

Once the decoupage dried I attached my Mod-Podged board to the picture frame with some glue and nails. My ¼ inch board had warped a little so I rested a heavy can on it to counter the warp.

Vintage Baseball Mod Podge Table Cheltenham Road

To bring it all together I now needed to attache the leg assembly to the 1/2 board and the 1/2 board to the picture frame.

I found the center of the 1/2 board by drawing lines from corner to corner. After that all I had to do was drill a pilot hole and attach my the board to the leg assembly.    Make sure the wood screw is flush with the surface of the board or just a little below it.Build a Side Table Tutorial Cheltenham Road

Attaching the leg to the picture frame was easy. I just flipped everything upside down and glued the top of the ½ board to the bottom of the picture frame.Mod Podge Baseball Table Tutorial Cheltenham Road

I brought back my handy paint can to hold it in place and seal the deal.

After that dried I flipped it back over and applied a sealer coat of Mod Podge over the collage surface.

Once that had dried thoroughly it was time for the Envirotex.  I’ve worked with this stuff a lot and always had good results.  Just be sure to follow the directions on the box exactly.

Once the Envirotex had thoroughly cured it was time for a beer!Man Cave Vintage Baseball Table Cheltenham Road

 

Tutorial: Pallet Wood Display Shelf

Tutorial - Turn a Pallet into a Display Shelf by Cheltenham RoadI’ve seen something like a billion pallet wood projects on the web and I was beginning to feel a bit left out when, happily,  the most expensive saw in the world came with its own pallet!

I was eager to use it but didn’t know what to make until I was cleaning some bookshelves  and decided my accidental vintage camera collection needed a  home.

Have you ever done that?  Accidentally started a collection?  I had no idea I collected cameras until I discovered I’d bought three of them.

So, burgeoning camera collection please meet pallet wood!Pallet Wood Shelf ProjectI’m not really good with advance planning so this project kind of “evolved” as I went – please bear with me as I improv my way toward a shelf.

First off I had to take the pallet apart.  I’d seen posts on Pinterest about “how to take apart a pallet” and thought disdainfully  “really?  We need a tutorial for that?”

I should have looked at them.  Those people  are not fooling around when they put those pallets together.

Once I got it pried apart I cut the wood  pieces down to 21” lengths reserving the remainder for the shelving.

It was at this point that I had the idea that it would look cool if I had a frame around the piece so I went digging and came up with the perfect size lengths  of wood (this is the point in other people’s tutorials where I begin to think “I’m so happy for you and your endless supply of perfect materials that you just have lying around.”  I do apologize for being that person but I really do produce a lot of random scrap wood)Tutorial Display Shelf made from an old palletI cut the ends of the frame wood at 45 degree angles and set about painting.

My plan was to paint it white – to contrast with the black cameras – but I did want a little distressing.

So I stained the edges of the wood, rubbed them with wax and then painted them white because…..that’s my move!

How to distress woodChicks dig it!

Once the paint had dried a quick sanding and voila! Semi-instant vintage wood!How To Make New Wood Look Old and Chippy Tutorial Cheltenham RoadI flipped all the pieces over and using my carpenters square to keep it, well, square, I attached them all together with a couple more pieces of scrap wood (sorry!).Simple DIY Reclaimed Pallet Wood Dislpay ShelfI attached the frame using my nail gun and some glue….and then patched the two corners where the frame didn’t quite meet.  Wood spackle for the cornersThe frame isn’t structural and thing was supposed to look rustic but there is a line between “rustic” and “dude can’t measure” and I didn’t want to make it quite so obvious that I have a permanent home in the latter camp.

I laid the shelving pieces out and maked their location – using my carpenter’s square to make sure they would be straight and level.Mark Front for Shelf Placement  I drilled pilot holes  and then screwed the shelves themselves in from the back.

And that’s all she wrote.Reused Pallate Wood Project ShelfI think it shows off the camera’s nicelyDIY Pallet Display Shelf

I’ve got a little space for new cameras …..and I’ll need some because, as I learned on Sesame Street …one of these things is not like the others……Pallet Wood Display Shelf Cheltenham RoadThatDIYPartybutton_zps5b45d013Home Storeis A 2 ZWAW_BUTTONbeyond the picket fence

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