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Folk Art Barnwood Painted Finish Technique, Stenciling and Mean Elementary School Teachers

easy-two-step-technique-to-create-an-aged-barnwood-effectDisclaimer: Plaid has provided me with the tools and materials for this project.  All opinions, however, are my own.

The folks at Folk Art have made a line of water based finishes that mimic the look of Concrete, Moss, Rust and Barnwood.

I’ve been itching to try out the Barnwood look.   I just wasn’t sure what I wanted to try it out on.

As usual I dithered a while and finally decided to use it on a simple crate.

But, as my plan evolved I realized I needed to face and overcome a longstanding fear:reasonable-vs-unreasonable-fears-list

I’m not quite sure why I find the idea of stenciling intimidating but I’ve kind of avoided using stencils all this time.

However, Plaid has sent me hundreds of stencils.  It appears that they too think I should get over myself.

To create the crate I used:diy-antique-crate-supplies

  • (2) 3.5x 1/2 craft wood strips cut to 11.5″ long
  • (2) 3.5×1/2″ craft wood strips cut to 7″ long
  • (1) piece of fiberboard for the bottom cut to 6 3/4″ x 12 1/4″
  • screws
  • brad nails (not pictured)
  • Hammer

To create the Barnwood  Paint Effect and Stencil I used

barnwood-stencil-supplies

  • Folk Art Barnwood Tint
  • Folk Art Barnwood Wax
  • Folk Art Milk Paint Brush (Folk Art Shortie Brushes are recommended for this technique but I didn’t have one on hand)
  • Craft Stick
  • Soft cloth
  • Folk Art Acrylic Craft Paint (Imperial Red)
  • Folk Art “Farmers Market” stencil
  • Plaid Stencil Brush

I will confess I was surprised to find out that “Barnwood” did not mean it was red.  But despite that initial hiccup I discovered that using the finish to creating the Barnwood look was a very easy two step process.

  • I sanded the unfinished wood and applied a coat of the Barnwood Tint
  • Once that had dried (four hours) I went over the surface with a coat of Barnwood Wax.
  • I wiped away any extra wax  and then went back in with a craft stick and scrapped away any excess wax allowing what remained to settle into the grooves of the wood (Note: one of my boards turned out to be a little warped so rather than the stiff craft stick I used a small piece of cardstock that had a bit more flexibility and that worked great).
  • Once I was satisfied with the look I set it aside to dry for 24 hours.faux-barnwood-painting-technique

I was impressed with the result.  There are lots of colors and variations and each of my four pieces ended up looking a bit different which really adds to the look of it.

two-step-barnwood-paint-effect

Then came the stencil!

My practice runs did’t bode well.  There were lots of leaks and blobs and fuzzy, unsatisfactory results.

However,  once I began actually following the instructions (which is a totally cool thing to do – you should try it!) and realized that when they say “you want your brush almost dry” they REALLY mean it I achieved, instantaneous Rock Star stencils.

I was killin’ it!!!! stencil-project

(I was not “killin’ it” however when I failed to center the the words on the wood.  Lets just chalk that up to over-excitement shall we and move on?).

As a matter of fact I was so pleased with how easy it was I stenciled all the other sides as well which wasn’t part of my initial plan.

Assembling the box was just a matter of screwing the sides together and using a few brad nails to attache the bottom.farmers-market-stencil-project

I actually took these final pictures in front of my rather aged backyard fence which I think looks pretty much exactly the same as the “Barnwood” paint!aged-barnwood-technique-tutorial

As an added bonus I had to buy all these vegetables for this picture.  So I will be eating vegetables!

(also, ice cream was on sale so I will be eating ice cream!)

All in all I’m pretty pleased with the Painted Finishes technique and I’m looking forward to trying out (and reporting back) on the other finishes.

And I am now all about stenciling!

The entire line of Folk Art Painted finishes are available and Michaels and JoAnn’s as well as via the Plaid web site (I do not receive any remuneration if you click that link)

*Mrs Gombert:

Tall.  Red, beehive hairdo.  Stern expression.  Limited sense of humor.  Name that sounds like a Middle Earth creature who, at first seems nice but soon reveals an evil plan: The Gombert.

I think she scared everyone but I earned a special place in her dark heart when, one day, after being given what I thought was an unreasonable amount of homework I quite innocently asked why “she got paid if we did all the work?”

OK, as an adult I recognize the flaw in my thinking (teachers please don’t email me) but, as a kid, it made sense to me.  However, this statement caused Mrs Gombert to become somewhat unhinged when it came to me (I once got detention for looking out the window!) and I lived in fear of her for the rest of the year.

She’d be on your list too.  Maybe even above spiders.

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About cheltenhamroad

I’ve been surrounded by amazingly creative people my whole life. My mom can, and does, make anything. The family has on occasion speculated that she just whipped up my dad one day when she discovered some left over fabric and stuffing. My three sisters have mad skills ranging from needlework to cooking to out and out ART. My father’s desk when I was growing up had a model train set going around it, oh, and he made that desk-from scratch. I’m the youngest and, as you can imagine, it’s a hard series of acts to follow. Truth be told, I’ve spent many, many years suppressing the creative instincts I learned at home. But I realized (rather late in life) that few things bring me more joy than making and creating. For the longest time when I went to stores I didn’t think, “I want that” I thought, “I can make that.” And, with a deep breath and a leap, I’ve started on a very new, kinda scary path. I’ve given up my steady, dependable (dull!) corporate life to spend my days happily humming away in my garage designing, creating, painting, decoupaging and sawing and, since this blog will be an honest take on things, there is also a fair amount of tripping, spilling and swearing. Through this blog I hope to share with you the struggles and (hopefully) triumphs of a very non-businessy business person. I also hope to make this blog a resource for people who like to work with their hands and who are, like me, always looking at things and thinking “I could make that!” I’ve lived many places since I left Cheltenham Road; I currently live in Los Angeles California. So, with this preamble- Welcome to Cheltenham Road! Please come on over and make yourself comfortable – the place is always open.

6 responses »

  1. So “INTENTIONAL public nudity” is okay with you? Please come to Thanksgiving dinner at my house. Aged Uncle Ralph loves to give his stomach a little more room to “stretch out” at the dinner table (use your imagination) and dinner tends to end abruptly at the same time. Adults advert their eyes, children scream and weep, and Uncle Ralph just puts a toothpick in his mouth and scratches. (I’m not far from Ohio so no excuses from you young man!)

    Oh yes…. love the barnwood thing. But you are right. It isn’t really barnwood if it’s not red. This is really aged wood which is lovely in its own right. You’ve become a stenciling savant overnight!

    Reply
  2. I love the stencil tutorial! And yes, I think reading the directions is important, and I think I usually try that after a few failed tries, top~ ( because “I know how to do it!” hahah!)
    And when you said if you did all the work then why did she get paid? Made me laugh out loud! It reminded me when I used to say, if going to school was my “job”, then why didn’t I get paid?? (This was about 6th grade…I ended up teaching 6th grade and still wondered…why don’t I get paid enough!? LOL!)
    As a teacher, I do NOT think it is wrong to have “that” teacher you did not like! I had a few! Some teachers didn’t like me just because of my older sister, who would correct teachers! (My sister was right, but teachers back then didn’t like it!). Thankfully, I learned how to get changed to a new class! (Thankful for nice counselors back then!)
    Great stenciling! Love it and definitely going to try it!
    Keep having fun! Love all of the things you create! Thanks for sharing with us!

    Reply
  3. Fabulous job!

    Mrs. Harper, 1st grade teacher, hit me on the bum with her purse at the Philly zoo. I guess I was dawdling. It’s a zoo; we’re supposed to look at the animals. 😉

    To make up for it, Mrs. Schutz, Jill’s mom/chaperone, bought me a panda ring. I had that ring for a very long time. And there were no pandas at the Philly zoo, but it was probably around the time China gifted them to the US. (even though I can’t possibly be that old) lol

    denise

    Reply
  4. After all these years you’re finally stenciling?? Yay. FYI, when you think you’ve taken enough paint off your brush…take more.

    Reply
  5. Not only do we get educated about crafting ideas but we also get your fabulous humour to go with it. Thanks, David!

    Reply
  6. I loved this post–hilarious! 🙂

    I’m sorry I have no mean teacher story though: I was always the Teacher’s Pet (but, and I’m sure this is somehow related, I have plenty of mean classmate stories)…

    I too have tried stenciling with horrific results. Gave up on it a long time ago. The dry-brush thing, never heard of it, but will remember it if I ever give it another try.

    The barnwood paint is BEAUTIFUL. Also, I’d like to see the rust paint in action one of these days.

    Thanks for making me laugh!

    Reply

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